How to Pay Taxes on Gambling Winnings and Losses (2024)

For many, gambling means buying the occasional lottery ticket on the way home from work, but the Internal Revenue Service says that casual gambling also includes raffles, casino games, poker, sports betting—and, yes, even fantasy football. When you win, your winnings are taxable income, subject to its own tax rules.

How to Pay Taxes on Gambling Winnings and Losses (1)

Key Takeaways

  • You're required to report all gambling winnings—including the fair market value of noncash prizes you win—as “other income” on your tax return.
  • You can’t subtract the cost of a wager from your winnings. However, you can claim your gambling losses as a tax deduction if you itemize your deductions.
  • Your deductions for gambling losses can’t exceed the gambling income you claimed. You can’t use gambling losses to reduce your other taxable income.
  • Depending on the amount you win and the kind of wager you place, you may receive a Form W-2G reporting your winnings to both you and the IRS. You are required to report your winnings even if you don't receive a Form W-2G.

You are required to report your winnings

The first rule is that the IRS requires you to report all winnings, whether the place that you gambled reports them to the IRS or not. For example, if you hit the trifecta on Derby Day, you are required to report the winnings as income.

The second rule is that you can’t subtract the cost of gambling from your winnings. For example, if you win $620 from a horse race but it cost you $20 to bet, your taxable winnings are $620, not $600 after subtracting your $20 wager. You are not permitted to "net" your winnings and losses.

Cash is not the only kind of winnings you need to report. If you win a new laptop in a raffle, this counts as income, too. You are required to claim the item’s fair market value at the time you won it, which would generally be the amount you would have to pay for the item if you bought it.

Form W-2G

Both cash and the value of prizes are considered “other income” on your Form 1040. If you score big, you might even receive a Form W-2G reporting your winnings. The tax code requires institutions that offer gambling to issue Forms W-2G if you win:

  • $600 or more on a horse race (if the win pays at least 300 times the wager amount);
  • $1,200 or more at bingo or on a slot machine;
  • $1,500 or more at keno;
  • $5,000 or more in a poker tournament.

Table games in a casino, such as blackjack, roulette, baccarat, or craps are exempt from the W-2G rule.

This doesn’t mean you don’t have to claim the income and pay taxes on it if your winnings aren’t enough to warrant the tax form. It just means that the institution won’t send a Form W-2G.

TurboTax Tip:

If you’re a professional gambler, you can file Schedule C as a self-employed individual. This allows you to deduct costs associated with your gambling activity, including meals and travel expenses. However, it also means you’ll have to pay self-employment tax on your net income from gambling.

You can deduct your losses…to an extent

You can’t deduct the cost of your wager from your winnings when determining how much you won, but you can deduct your gambling losses subject to certain rules.

  • You have to itemize your deductions to claim your gambling losses as a tax deduction.
  • This means you can’t take the standard deduction for your filing status, which often amounts to more than a taxpayer’s itemized deductions.

You’re allowed to deduct losses only up to the amount of the gambling winnings you claimed. So, if you won $2,000 but lost $5,000, your itemized deduction is limited to $2,000. You can’t use the remaining $3,000 to reduce your other taxable income. You have to claim $2,000 in income on your Form 1040 and then separately claim $2,000 as an itemized deduction.

If you’re a professional gambler

Does the tax picture change if you don’t just dabble in gambling, but actually make your living at it? Yes and no. Deductions from losses that exceed your winnings still are not allowed. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1987 in the case of Commissioner vs. Groetzinger that deductions for losses cannot exceed the income from winnings.

If you regularly pursue gambling with the intention of making a profit, then it’s effectively your day-to-day job. Rather than claiming your winnings as “other income” on your Form 1040, you will file Schedule C as a self-employed individual.

This is an important distinction, because you can deduct your other costs of doing business on Schedule C, ultimately reducing your taxable income. For example, you can deduct the costs of:

  • Magazines, periodicals, and other data that relate to your gambling profession
  • The business portion of your Internet costs, if you wager online
  • Meals and travel expenses if you attend tournaments or other gambling events

The downside of going pro is that you’ll have to pay self-employment tax (Social Security and Medicare) on your net income from gambling.

Let a local tax expert matched to your unique situation get your taxes done 100% right with TurboTax Live Full Service. Your expert will uncover industry-specific deductions for more tax breaks and file your taxes for you. Backed by our Full Service Guarantee.

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How to Pay Taxes on Gambling Winnings and Losses (2024)
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